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100 under $100 Closing Soireé

Join us Friday for an after-work cocktail, some hobnobbing, and a chance to pick up some of the last remaining goodies in our 100 under $100 show.

Friday, October  20 — 4:30-7:30 PM

There are paintings, photographs, lovely ink drawings, collages, mixed media constructions and much more. All ready to take home and hang on your wall.

buyartfromme

squares tesla peanut elsie

 

Coming First Thursday: 100 under $100

Our next open house will feature the ever-popular, fourth annual, 100 under $100 show.

A curated show of one hundred pieces of art, each priced at $100 or less, opens Thursday, September 7 as part of the Pioneer Square Art Walk. The main event will be that evening from 5-9 PM, with a frenzy of collectors and art literally flying off the wall (ok, maybe not literally, but you can take home your purchases that night). The remaining work will stay up through the month, or as long as the art lasts, and open by appointment.

Browse the gallery walls and drop in on the artists’ studios as our unofficial house songster, the talented and adorable Victor Janusz, serenades you on the piano.

Paintings, collages, mixed media creations, photographs, prints, and more, by these artists and undoubtedly more:

Celeste Cooning
Dara Solliday
Elizabeth Arzani
Eric Eschenbach
Etta Lilienthal
Henrietta’s Eye (Libby Bulloff/Stephen Robinson)
Jane Richlovsky
Jeanie Lewis
Jeff Scott
Joseph Pentheroudakis
Kelly Lyles
Keven Furiya
Krisna Schumann
Laura Tempest Zakroff
Lindsay Peyton
Liz Ewings
Mandy Amsel
Marne Cohen Vance
Matthew Potter
Molly Magai
Nathan Vass
Nia Michaels
Rachel Illingworth
Sandy Nelson
Sarah Dillon
Savina Mason
Stephen Robinson
Warren Munzel

 

Original Hits by Original Artists: An Exhibit of TOTALLY FAKE Album Covers

R.I.P. the album cover, sort of. We said our goodbyes to that roomy square-foot of substantial cardstock, with its fantastic artwork — maybe by Warhol or Dali or Mapplethorpe —to name just a few. We also said our goodbyes to the hours of contemplation of the cover-art while the music spun on a nearby turntable, a unique synthesis of the aural with the visual with the tactile — a feast for the soul. Then the album cover was demoted in both size and importance, a mere afterthought of a booklet cover, encased in brittle plastic. Now stripped of its physicality entirely, it’s relegated to the ether where its low-rez pixelated remains live out their diminished existence barely visible on tiny hand-held screens. Until now! With LP sales now at a twenty-eight-year high, the album cover (both genuine and fake) is back!

Original Hits by Original Artists, opening May 4 right downstairs on the first floor of the Good Arts Building, will pay proper homage to the art of the album cover, both past and present—without the album. The exhibit features covers for dozens of fabricated albums cut by bands that exist only in the artists’ imaginations. The show will be on view May 4 – May 31, 2017 at 108 Cherry Street in the Good Arts Building (downstairs from ’57 Biscayne).

A Release Party and reception for the artists will be held First Thursday, May 4, 6:00 -10:00 p.m. followed by the Upstream Music Fest, May 11-13, when there will be actual live (if unrelated) music on site, programmed by Upstream during the run of the festival. One of a handful of free venues in the neighborhood, it will be open from 4-8 PM with music on May 11 and 12; and 1-8 on Saturday the 13th, with music from 4-8. The exhibit will also be open on the last two Fridays and Saturdays in May, from 1-6PM and by appointment.

Original Hits is curated by artist Jane Richlovsky of ’57 Biscayne which, incidentally, was named for a Joni Mitchell song lyric. For this show Richlovsky and fellow artist Dara Solliday invited approximately thirty-three and one third artists to unearth those long-forgotten catch phrases that had once sparked a reply of “That would make a great band name!” and then create a full-size old-school 12-inch LP album cover for this hypothetical hitmaker. Artists include Romson Bustillo, Kelly Lyles, Nia Michaels, Jed Dunkerley, Gabriel Campanario, and Richlovsky, showing fake album covers in paint, collage, repurposed tin, textiles, wood, and who knows what else.

About the venue: The Good Arts Building was purchased by an artist/developer partnership, Good Arts LLC, in 2015, with the mission of promoting the interdependent prosperity of artists and other neighborhood businesses and institutions. ’57 Biscayne Studios are located on its second floor.

Placiness in progress…

Savina Mason installs her magical purple site-specific piece in the former corporate Zen garden, while Jane Richlovsky hangs new lights. Placiness will debut in our unrecognizably-transformed lobby gallery on First Thursday, have extended hours through Art Fair weekend, and run through August 28. Twenty superb Seattle artists represent, reflect, and redefine their city.

Photo by Dara Solliday

June 2, 2016: The return of “100 under $100”

We’re opening the doors for First Thursday in June, and bringing back the ever-popular “100 under $100” art extravaganza for the third time. One-hundred pieces of very affordable art will hang on our walls, going home with the lucky buyers who snatch them up for a mere $100 or less. Lots of artists, lots of styles. lots of fun.

Also browse the open studios of ’57 Biscayne to see what the artists are up to, chitchat with friends, make new ones, and listen to Victor Janusz sing timeless classics at our piano. victor

Thursday June 2, 6-10 PM and then by appointment through the month of June, as long as supplies last. Curated by Jane Richlovsky and Dara Solliday.

Here is a (somewhat random) sneak peek of the show. Also check the facebook page for additional updates and images.

Photography by Nathan Vass

Nathan Vass

Nia Michaels

Nia Michaels

Kristen Winn

Kristen Winn

Karin Bolstad

Karin Bolstad

Amanda Amsel

Amanda Amsel

bradenduncan

Braden Duncan

magai

Molly Magai

Mars Flag - Cheri Kopp 2008

Cheri Kopp

ewing

Liz Ewing

Seattle Sketcher features ’57 Biscayne Artists

It’s been a week of viaduct stories in the Seattle media, including a resurgence of interest in the old 619 Western building, as in, “Say, whatever happened to those artists?”  Bertha the tunneling machine, for whose vibrations we were evacuated from the 619 five years ago, will be burrowing under the old homestead later this month, just a few years behind schedule.

Gabriel Campanario, the famous Seattle Times Sketcher, interviewed and, of course, sketched, Jane and Libby last week and featured our story in his column on Saturday. Perhaps taking Libby’s point that it might be a good idea to go easy on the nostalgia for a particular building and support artists wherever they are, he prominently featured our present digs, the Good Arts Building.

The Good Arts Building

On December 15,  2015, the building housing ’57 Biscayne (historically known as the Scheuerman Building) officially passed into the hands of Good Arts LLC,  a collaboration between four entities: artist Jane Richlovsky of ’57 Biscayne and the second-floor master lease holder of the building; Greg Smith of Urban Visions Real Estate; Steve Coulter, ACT Theatre Technical Director; and Cherry Good Arts LLC, headed by Cherry Street Coffee House founder Ali Ghambari. The group’s name pays homage the “Good Eats” cafeteria that occupied the building a century ago.

It seems every week brings a new story of artists or beloved small businesses being outpriced and displaced out of the popular, thriving neighborhoods they helped create. This unlikely alliance of an artist and developer is writing a different story, staking a claim in a corner of Pioneer Square to preserve and maintain commercial space for artists and arts-related businesses and to promote the cultural and economic vitality of the neighborhood.

Apparently we’re not the only ones hungry for a new story – here is some of the press coverage so far:

Puget Sound Business Journal

City Arts Magazine

The Stranger

Plans for the immediate future of the building include a commercial gallery and adjacent workspaces in one of the currently vacant storefronts, and a pocket craft retail space to be added to the second-floor lobby early next year. In late 2016, construction will begin on Cherry Street Public House in the corner and two adjacent storefronts.

In the longer term, the new owners plan to restore the basement to its historic role as a performance space. The Skid Road Show operated there from 1972 -1982, a jazz club during the 1940s, as well as less reputable enterprises (which the owners do not intend to revive). They will retain the second floor as affordable workspaces for artists and create additional ones as space becomes available elsewhere in the building.

The Good Arts Mission Statement
Given that artists, craftspeople, and creative businesses form the core of the historical identity of Seattle and, more specifically, Pioneer Square, Good Arts LLC endeavors to maintain that identity and promote economic and creative vitality through responsible real estate development.
Our mission is to preserve and expand the presence of the creative class in Pioneer Square by responsibly renovating and operating the historic Scheuermann Building specifically to supply affordable space for creation, promotion, and exhibition of a broad range of artistic endeavors.
We believe that economic development should include the creative class as its beneficiary as well as its catalyst. To that end, we also foster connections between, and promote the interdependent prosperity of, artists and other neighborhood businesses and institutions.

For more information see the Good Arts website.

above: New owners Steve Coulter, Jane Richlovsky, & Greg Smith celebrating the closing of the deal; not pictured is Ali Ghambari, who was visiting family in Tehran and thus unable to order a martini. (photo: Kara Kesler)

When Artists Get Together They Talk About Real Estate

As cities across the nation struggle with the displacement of culture by rising real estate prices, the conversation seems to be stuck on the idea of artists as hapless victims in this struggle. Biscayne founder Jane Richlovsky’s recent experience with a studio eviction and her subsequent attempts to be part of the broader solution led her to rethink the role of the artist as and economic as well as cultural actor.

Photo: Some 619 Western artists on their last night in the building. Courtesy of Peter DeLory