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“Ghosts of Flesh Avenue” on view downstairs

Guest artist and honorary Biscaynito Amanda James Parker has installed her video homage to peep shows of yore in the storefront beneath ’57 Biscayne studios. More here, at the Good Arts Building website.

Welcome to our newest Biscaynito!

We’re super-excited to announce that we’ve filled the cute new nook of a studio with the lovely Celeste Cooning, cutter of intricate patterns in Tyvek and much more.  She will be settled in by our next open house, December 1st in time to celebrate the holidays. Welcome to the community, Celeste, and we look forward to future co-inspirations and collaborations!

That the studio had a line-up of fabulous and personable artists ready to take it before it was even built speaks to the utter dearth of affordable cultural space in this town. Good Arts is looking forward to building some additional work & gallery spaces on the street level of the building in the upcoming months. Please join our mailing list to keep abreast of developments. While we’re at it, let’s hear a shout-out to those who are working to create affordable space elsewhere in the city: Sam Farraizaino at Equinox, Timothy Firth at Common Area Maintenance,  and many others, most of them artists themselves.

Studio 214: A work in progress!

In celebration of our fifth year anniverisary, and in keeping with building owner Good Arts’ mission of maximizing creative space, we are adding a new studio to ’57 Biscayne! It’s being carved lovingly out of the second-floor lobby, and will have its own door across from the main ’57 Biscayne entrance, with full access to ’57 Biscayne’s kitchen, bathrooms, and other common areas. And we’re looking for a new creative community member to rent it and join the fun. It will be ready & available to rent November 1st, in plenty of time to be part of our December First Thursday Open House.

The finished space will be a 170-square foot L-shape, with variable ceiling height, operable south-facing windows, a transom for ventilation, newly refinished fir floors, a combination of track and can lighting, and loads of charm. Perfect for a painter, jeweler, or clothing designer, to name just a few. $400 monthly rent is inclusive of utilities. Available November 1. Contact Jane to find out more and take a tour.

View from inside the studio looking at the '57 Biscayne main door. The openings are for a full-light door and transom window.

View from inside the studio looking at the ’57 Biscayne main door. The openings are for a full-light door and transom window.

This is the view as you walk into the space. The tall pitched ceiling above you is the bottom of the staircase.

This is the view as you walk into the space. The tall pitched ceiling above you is the bottom of the staircase.

Windows look onto Cherry Street. Yes, they open.

Windows look onto Cherry Street.

Cute built-in bench seat looks out the windows. (Could also be made into a desk or work table.)

Cute built-in bench seat looks out the windows. It could also be replaced with a desk or work table.

A second set of windows overlook the stairs and bring in some additional light.

A second set of windows overlook the stairs and bring in some additional light.

March Open House and welcome, CoCA!

We’ll be opening up the house upstairs for First Thursday Artwalk on March 3, while downstairs, the Center on Contemporary Art will be opening 35 Live: CoCA Members’ Show in their new pop-up location here in the Good Arts Building.

Resident artists will be showing tintypes, letterpress, jewelry, paintings, and other fabulous things made on the premises, from 6 to 9 PM.  In our newly gussied-up lobby, where the original wood floors have been uncovered and shinied, Victor Janusz will be serenading us on piano starting at 7.

When Artists Get Together They Talk About Real Estate

As cities across the nation struggle with the displacement of culture by rising real estate prices, the conversation seems to be stuck on the idea of artists as hapless victims in this struggle. Biscayne founder Jane Richlovsky’s recent experience with a studio eviction and her subsequent attempts to be part of the broader solution led her to rethink the role of the artist as and economic as well as cultural actor.

Photo: Some 619 Western artists on their last night in the building. Courtesy of Peter DeLory