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Cute studio on the 3rd Floor

This studio has been rented. To receive notices about future openings, please sign up for our mailing list.

This cozy charmer will be available December 1, 2021. Studio 309 is 185 square feet and rents for $515/month. The studio has three huge west-facing windows, and decent heat/AC. Its slightly quirky shape lends itself well to an easel painter, or mixed-media artist with multiple small work stations.

Rent includes utilities, shared wifi, and use of common areas, which include kitchenette, clean restrooms, lobby areas with seating, and opportunities to help curate and show art in the hall galleries and other nooks and crannies. We have historically held cooperatively-organized open houses twice a year, which we hope to resume soon. Spontaneous collaboration has been known to occur, even during these crazy times.

Leases are one year with a month-to-month default option after that.

The members of this community are serious about their art, professional, and supportive of other artists. We care about our health and the health of others and have been diligent about keeping each other safe. We welcome all peoples and genders, and naturally expect anyone who joins us to do likewise.

Contact the proprietrix for a viewing.

This wall is at a slight angle to accommodate the hall.
West-facing windows get nice afternoon light. The center one opens.
The second floor lobby. One more flight!
Entering the 3rd floor hall
The gallery/hall with an awesome skylight. This studio is at the end and to the right.

Historic Seattle, Good Arts LLC announce partnership

The community-based preservation organization Historic Seattle is teaming up with the current owners of the Good Arts Building, whose upper floors are home to ’57 Biscayne studios, to preserve the building and continue its mission as a hub for arts, culture and creative enterprises in perpetuity.

Historic Seattle’s board has given preliminary approval to an agreement to purchase a majority stake in the property.

The Good Arts Building, located at 110 Cherry Street, on the corner of First Avenue, stands at the north gateway to Seattle’s Pioneer Square Preservation District.

Historically known as the Scheuerman Block, it was designed by Elmer Fisher in 1889 for Christian Scheuerman and completed in 1890. Throughout the years, the building has been a hub of entrepreneurial, creative, and colorful endeavors.

The name “Good Arts” pays homage to “Good Eats,” a two-story diner once housed in its walls. The building has also been home to department stores, a cigar shop, jazz club, boxing gym, brothels, speakeasies and the original office of Washington Mutual Savings Bank.

In the 1970s, the basement housed the first gay and lesbian community center in Seattle, followed by the Skid Road Theatre, in which such local theatrical stalwarts as Kurt Beattie, R. Hamilton Wright, and Linda Hartzell produced original shows during the company’s 10 successful years.

In 2011, the building took on its current role, as a hub for the arts, when a dozen artists, evicted from the nearby 619 Western Building, established ’57 Biscayne studios on the second floor.

In 2015, Good Arts LLC—an unlikely collaboration of developer Greg Smith, artist Jane Richlovsky, theatre veteran Steve Coulter, and Cherry Street Coffee founder Ali Ghambari—purchased the building with the mission of preserving its artistic heritage and affordability to creative enterprises. The building now houses 27 artist studios, as well as Bad Bishop Bar, Saké Nomi, Beneath the Streets Tours and other small businesses.

“Since acquiring the building in 2015, Good Arts LLC has done an incredible job of providing affordable space for artists in Seattle’s most historic and artistic neighborhood, Pioneer Square,” said Kji Kelly, executive director at Historic Seattle. “Protecting community use of space is critical in this changing city.

“While landmarking and historic districts save places, mission-based ownership is what protects purpose. Our organization is dedicated to saving meaningful places that foster lively communities, so this partnership with Good Arts LLC is in perfect alignment with our mission,” Kelly continued.

“Too often artists’ cultural and economic contributions are rewarded with displacement from the neighborhoods they helped make interesting and vital,” Richlovsky added. “It’s rare that developers recognize that, and even rarer they step up to help.”

“Arts and culture are central to the historic fabric of Seattle and what makes Pioneer Square and our broader community unique and vibrant to this day,” said Urban Visions CEO and Good Arts partner Greg Smith. “Preserving this building and the artistic endeavors within was a personal passion of mine and I am thrilled to see Historic Seattle taking this step to ensure the building’s long-term uses will remain focused on fostering arts, culture and creativity.”

Now, Richlovsky, who has had a studio in Pioneer Square for 20 years, is looking forward to a new chapter.

“I’m really excited to take what we’ve built together and hand the reins to Historic Seattle. They get us,” she said. “I am planning to be here for at least 20 more.”

Good Arts partners Ali Ghambari, Greg Smith, Steve Coulter, and Jane Richlovsky stride purposefully into the future. (photo: Jesse Spring)

Happy Birthday to Us!

October 1, 2021 marked the 10th anniversary of our founding.

What started as a tale of eviction, traffic and threats of earthquake has since turned into a stable, successful fixture and cultural icon of the historic arts district.

In 2011, 110 artists were evicted from the 619 Western building, the largest and longest- running artists’ community on the West Coast. The Washington State Department of Transportation (DOT) was paving the way for the State Route 99 tunnel, which would pass underneath the building.

The headlines screamed “artists evicted,” and much ink was spilled on the myth of the starving artist — hapless, helpless, and now, homeless.

Many of the artists themselves, however, had another plan in mind. As required by law, the DOT was to provide relocation benefits to qualifying artist-businesses. Resourcefully, about a dozen of the displaced artists pooled their benefits to build a new community of studios out of a vacant office space a few blocks away at 110 Cherry Street.

The timeline for their move was further accelerated when City of Seattle engineers independently determined the building to be seismically unstable, an immediate threat to life and limb.

Artist Jane Richlovsky took out a master lease on a floor of the historic Scheuerman Building around the corner on Cherry Street, secured permits, and found a contractor. She worked with other artists and the DOT to fund the moving of lights and walls, as well as the installation of work sinks and other amenities.

The artists put the finishing touches on the place, accomplishing the entire task in six weeks and moving in October 1, 2011, the deadline to vacate the old building.

Collaborations have been born within these walls, and our semi-annual open houses are popular destinations for exhibits, music, and affordable art. We have hosted tours of the studios for groups such as Main Street America, Alliance for Pioneer Square, Urban Land Institute, as well as college students from the University of Washington, and high school students bussed in from Mukilteo, Washington and Whitefish, Montana.

Wanting to assure ‘57 Biscayne’s future, as Pioneer Square grew into a restaurant and tech haven, Richlovsky and her partner Steve Coulter teamed up with Cherry Street Coffee House owner Ali Ghambari and developer Greg Smith to purchase the entire building together in 2015.

They formed Good Arts LLC with the mission of offering affordable workspace for artists and other creative small businesses to ensure the continued vitality and character of Pioneer Square and Seattle.

A few years later, when a tech company vacated another floor in the building, Good Arts built out another dozen studios, doubling ‘57 Biscayne’s capacity.

As creative spaces around the city have been lost to development and rising rents, many displaced artists have found their way to ‘57 Biscayne.

For ten years, the studios have been affordable workspace for a variety of artists, including painters, printmakers, analogue and digital photographers, jewelers, ceramicists, public artists, videographers, book designers, clothing designers, architects, a marimba duo and even a boutique video game console manufacturer.

Due to uncertainties around the Delta variant and ever-changing Covid protocols, a planned in-person 10th anniversary celebration has been cancelled.

Instead, we’ve created an online showcase of pictures, writing and videos centered around the work people have made and what their time here has meant to their artistic growth and careers.

This just in: A deal is imminent yet still unofficial that will ensure the existence of ‘57 Biscayne in perpetuity. Stay tuned!

Big-ass studio with giant skylight

Update: This space has been rented. To get first notice of future available studios, sign up for our mailing list.

This spacious beauty will be available October 1, 2021. Studio 312 is 735 square feet and rents for $1650/month. The studio has track & fluorescent lighting, and decent heat/AC. If you wanted to install ventilation to the outside, the infrastructure is there. There is 220v power. Other possible upgrades could be negotiated for the right long-term tenant. It would make a great shared maker space, photo studio, print shop, or gallery.

Rent includes utilities, shared wifi, and use of common areas, which include kitchenette, clean restrooms, lobby areas with seating, and opportunities to help curate and show art in the hall galleries and other nooks and crannies. We have historically held cooperatively-organized open houses twice a year, which we hope to resume soon. Spontaneous collaboration has been known to occur, even during these crazy times.

Leases are one year with a month-to-month default option after that.

The members of this community are serious about their art, professional, and supportive of other artists. We care about our health and the health of others and have been diligent about keeping each other safe. We welcome all peoples and genders, and naturally expect anyone who joins us to do likewise.

Contact the proprietrix for a viewing.

Whopping huge skylight with view of the Hogue building.
From under the skylight.
Looking from the corner towards the door
Third-floor hallway

Spacious studio for rent on the second floor

Update: This studio has been rented. Please join our mailing list to keep informed about any future vacancies.

Studio 210 is available for rent, beginning February 1. This lovely space is 532 square feet, longer than it is wide. It’s perfect for a photographer, but painters and sculptors have also occupied and enjoyed it. Windows face west onto First Avenue, with plenty of streaming afternoon sunlight (weather permitting) and gallery track lighting. Rent of $1100 monthly covers utilities, wifi, and shared use of common areas, which include kitchenette, clean restrooms, and generous, professionally lit hallway galleries. Traditionally, we have had cooperatively-organized open houses twice a year, and spontaneous collaboration has been known to occur. We look forward to resuming all that and more later this year.

Leases are one year with a month-to-month default option after that.

The members of this community are serious about their art, professional, and supportive of other artists. We welcome all peoples and genders, and naturally expect anyone who joins us to do likewise.

Contact Jane to see the place.

The front lobby and entrance. One of those adorable mailboxes could be yours.
Freshly-painted kitchenette, and a table at which we once socialized—and will again.
The hall right outside 210, featuring a handy sink and some art.

Studio Share for Rent (2 of 2)

The occupant of 212 is in the market for a new studio mate. The studio is 405 square feet total, and an artist who works in water-based media is looking to share it with another like-minded and low-toxicity person. The share for rent is approximately 200 square feet for $355/month (total rent is $710). The space has a big window facing the hall and high ceilings. A drop ceiling was removed in 2011, so there’s exposed ducting and a sort of industrial vibe. There is one exposed brick wall (on which it is OK to hang things, within reason) and each half has a big white wall of their own with new track and overhead lighting. The space will be available December 1.  Contact Clare if you are interested. (clare_e_johnson@yahoo.com)

Rent includes utilities & shared WIFI. The common areas include a kitchenette and break area; modern clean bathrooms; and spacious hallways which are available for tenant use for hanging art, events, installations, etc. We have historically had two cooperatively-organized open houses a year; those will resume as soon as it is safe to do so. Spontaneous collaboration has been known to occur.

The members of this community are serious about their art and supportive of other artists, and conscientious about safely sharing space during this time. We welcome all peoples and genders, and naturally expect anyone who joins us to do likewise.

Studio Share for Rent (1 of 2)

Our newest Biscaynito is looking for someone to share a large space.

The studio is 530 sq ft, with excellent light, high ceilings and 3 very long walls. The building is beautiful, well cared for and is in excellent condition. I have one half of the space and am looking for someone for the other half. The price is $550 each which includes all utilities and wi-fi.  
I am looking for someone to work evenings and weekends during the pandemic. Though the space is large it would be uncomfortable to wear masks all day so I prefer working at different times for maximum safety during this time.

Please contact the tenant directly if you are interested!

More Biscaynitos in the News

It’s hard to keep up! Watch this interview on KING-5 and read more at Seattle Refined about Cristina Martinez’s intertwined life and career journeys—and how she recently raised $20,000 for Campaign Zero and New Leaders. Cristina and her awesome sprouts are always a bright spot on the third floor. Congrats!

Biscaynitos in the News!

Mari & Misbah of M & M Jewelry Studio were featured on KING-5 for their pandemic “We’ve Got This” necklace project. In true Biscayne spirit, they are donating half the proceeds from sales of the necklace to the White Center Food Bank.

Meanwhile, proprietrix Jane Richlovsky was asked by KUOW’s Marcie Sillman, “How are artists doing at this time?” Well, how long have you got? Not long, as it turned out. You can listen to the whole show here, at the top of the show, or scroll to the bottom for the Good Arts/Biscayne segment.

Square Deal: 50 Artists for a Fair Vote

This June 4 marked the first time in seven years that ’57 Biscayne didn’t hold our annual 100 under $100 show. However, we do have something special planned for September 3, which will be another opportunity to collect affordable art AND support voting rights in swing states across the US this fall.

The Movement Voter Project (MVP) raises funds nationwide to support the best and most promising grassroots organizations in key swing states, with a focus on youth and communities of color. MVP vets and supports hundreds of incredible groups that fight voter suppression, get out the vote, swing elections, win on issues, and organize in their communities.

We are holding our own fundraiser for MVP this September, with sneak previews opening online in August. Fifty artists have created a delightful 8″ x 8″ square of gorgeosity, just for this show, which we will hang as a live exhibit and post to an online gallery. If you are one of the first 50 people to donate at least $100 to MVP through a secure dedicated link, you get to choose a piece of art for your collection. The whole event will happen on the interwebs, with a live event pending Safe Start Washington restrictions.

The fun part: you pick the art you like, and you won’t know who the artist is until you claim it. Here is a list of the artists, to whet your appetite:

Aidan Sakakini
Ann Marie Schneider
Barbara Robertson
Chris Crites
Chris Rollins
Clare Johnson
Daniel Carrillo
Dara Solliday
Dawn Endean
Donna Graham
Elijah Pasco
Eric Eschenbach
Erin Shigaki
Esther Ervin
George Abeyta
Grego Ratchko
Henrietta’s Eye
Jane Richlovsky
Jed Dunkerly
Jeff Scott
Jody Joldersma
Johanna Christianson
Juan Alonso Rodriguez
Julie Kim
Kamla Kakaria
Kelly Lyles
Keven Furiya
Krisna Schumann
Lindsay Peyton
LinLin Mao
Liz Ewings
Magda Baker
Marita Dingus
Matthew Potter
MD Jenkins
Michelle Kumata
Misha Zadeh Graham
Molly Magai
Pat DeCaro
Paul Nunn
Ray Monde
Richard Graham
Rickie Wolfe
Romson Bustillo
Savina Mason
Shaun Doll
Siobhan McCloskey
Sue Springer
Suze Woolf
Thomas Schwoerer

Stay tuned for more details and sneak peeks! If you aren’t already on our mailing list, scroll to the bottom of the sidebar to sign up and get first dibs.